A Machine Launches a Tennis Ball - Vertical Component of Velocity

Understanding the Vertical Component of Velocity

When a machine launches a tennis ball with a speed of 10 meters per second at an angle of 40 degrees above the ground, we can determine the vertical component of the ball's velocity. This component plays a crucial role in understanding the motion of the ball and its trajectory.

Velocity is a vector quantity that includes both magnitude and direction. In this scenario, the vertical component of velocity will help us analyze how fast the ball is moving in an upward or downward direction.

Let's calculate the vertical component of the ball's velocity to better comprehend its motion and behavior.

Calculating the Vertical Component

We are given: Initial velocity (v) = 10 meters per second Launch angle (θ) = 40 degrees

To find the vertical component of the ball's velocity, we can use trigonometry. The vertical component can be calculated by multiplying the full velocity by the sine of the launch angle.

Vertical Component = Velocity x sin(angle)

Vertical Component = 10 m/s x sin(40)

Vertical Component ≈ 6.43 m/s

Conclusion

Therefore, the vertical component of the ball's velocity is approximately 6.43 meters per second. This value helps us understand how fast the ball is moving in the vertical direction.

Understanding the components of velocity is essential in analyzing the motion of objects, such as tennis balls, in various scenarios.

A machine launches a tennis ball with a speed of 10. meters per second at an angle 40.° above the ground. What is the vertical component of the ball’s velocity? A) 6.43 m/s B) 7.66 m/s C) 8.43 m/s D) 9.66 m/s Final answer: The vertical component of the ball's velocity is 6.43 m/s. Explanation: To find the vertical component of the ball's velocity, we need to use trigonometry. The vertical component can be found by multiplying the full velocity by the sine of the launch angle. In this case, the launch angle is 40 degrees, so: Vertical Component = Velocity x sin(angle) = 10 m/s x sin(40) = 6.43 m/s So, the correct answer is A) 6.43 m/s.
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