Vessel 'Underway' Definition: Which Vessel Matches the Criteria?

Which vessel is considered "underway" according to the Rules?

A. A pilot vessel at anchor

B. A vessel made fast to a single point mooring buoy

C. A vessel engaged in towing, not making way

D. A vessel which has run aground

Answer:

A vessel is considered 'underway' if it is not at anchor, directly attached to the shore (made fast), or aground. So, a vessel engaged in towing, not making way would be considered 'underway'.

According to the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREGs) and the Inland Navigation Rules, a vessel is considered to be "underway" if it is not at anchor, made fast to the shore, or aground. This means, of the options listed in the question, the vessel which could be considered 'underway' would be C. A vessel engaged in towing, not making way.

It's important to remember that being 'underway' does not necessarily mean that the vessel is moving, it simply means it isn't securely anchored or moored, or grounded.

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