Drawbacks of Using Sea Water (Salts) in Portland Cement Concrete

What are the drawbacks of using sea water (salts) in Portland cement concrete?

The drawbacks of using sea water (salts) in Portland cement concrete include corrosion of reinforcement, reduced strength and durability, increased permeability, efflorescence, and environmental impact.

Explanation:

Drawbacks of using sea water (salts) in Portland cement concrete:

Corrosion of reinforcement: The salts in sea water can react with the steel reinforcement in concrete, leading to corrosion. This can weaken the structure and compromise its integrity.

Reduced strength and durability: The presence of salts can affect the hydration process of cement, resulting in reduced strength and durability of the concrete. This can lead to premature cracking and deterioration.

Increased permeability: Sea water contains salts that can increase the permeability of concrete. This allows for the ingress of harmful substances, such as chlorides, which can further accelerate corrosion and damage the concrete.

Efflorescence: The salts in sea water can cause efflorescence, which is the formation of white crystalline deposits on the surface of the concrete. This can affect the appearance and aesthetics of the concrete.

Environmental impact: Using sea water in concrete can have environmental implications, as it may contribute to the depletion of fresh water resources and disrupt the natural balance of ecosystems.

Considering these drawbacks, it is important to carefully evaluate the use of sea water in Portland cement concrete and explore alternative solutions to mitigate these issues.

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